Nine Ways Hemp Could Save the World

World Environmental Day is a UN holiday, with the specific aim of raising awareness of environmental threats and encouraging action to protect our environment. Each year has a theme and this year’s theme is air pollution. Polluted air is one of the biggest environmental threats we face today, nine out of ten of us breathe in polluted air and it is responsible for an estimated seven million premature deaths worldwide. Air pollution is caused in all walks of life from industrial power plants to household waste.  

There are many ways in which we can all do our bit to help the environment, from walking or using public transport to recycling or reusing as much as possible. There are also many ways in which large industries could make changes to help our planet. One of those ways is to embrace Hemp.

The Hemp strain of the Cannabis Sativa plant can be made into more than 25,000 different products. Every part of the plant is useful, from the seeds used in food and supplements, the storks for natural fibers, and the leaves and flowers can be made into cosmetic products.

Here’s nine ways Hemp could help save the world…


The CO₂ Sequesterer

Climate change and the effects it will have on our planet is one of the most hotly debated topics across the world at the moment. One of the major contributors to rising global temperatures are the carbon emissions released into the atmosphere every day. CO₂ released into the atmosphere comes from five main human sources: household, industry, transport, agriculture, and waste.

While trees absorb Carbon Dioxide and release Oxygen, they do not absorb enough to keep up with the sheer amount of CO₂ released into the air, and deforestation means there are less and less trees every day. Hemp, on the other hand, absorbs more CO₂ than any other plant, and can absorb four times more CO₂ than trees.  For every tonne of Hemp that is grown, 1.63 tonnes of CO₂ is removed from the atmosphere. This process is called Carbon Sequestration, and once the CO₂ has been absorbed by the Hemp plant it remains trapped, unable to re-enter the atmosphere.


Paper Money

Scientists predict that there will be no rainforest in 100 years time, with the equivalent of 48 football fields is cut down every minute. No more rainforest means a lot more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and a lot less oxygen. Most of these trees end up as paper, and while many companies now have schemes in place to plant one new tree for every one cut down, they simply can’t keep up with demand as it can take a minimum of 20 years for trees to mature.

There is, however, a cheaper, more environmentally friendly way to produce paper.

Hemp was once the most popular plant used to make paper, the Declaration of Independence was written on Hemp paper and in 19th century Russia it was used for banknotes. It was so popular that the timber industry even lobbied for it to be banned at the beginning of the 20th century, such was the threat to the timber industry. While it takes years for trees to mature, Hemp cultivation only takes 12-16 weeks. Hemp is naturally able to thrive in most climates, meaning that it can be planted year round in most places, and that one acre of Hemp can produce four times more paper than one acre of trees. Hemp storks are 85% cellulose, compared to trees which are 30%, which means harsh chemicals are required to extract the rest of the pulp used in the papermaking process. Basically, the more cellulose, the less chemicals required. Hemp paper also doesn’t require bleaching with chlorine as timber paper does, and it is more durable and longer lasting than paper made from timber due to the lack of harsh chemicals used in the production process.


A New Age for Bioplastics

Over the last few years, single-use plastic has become public enemy #1. More than 45 billion plastic bottles are bought every year, along with billions of other single use products. More than eight million tonnes of plastic reach our oceans every year, killing wildlife, and contaminating our food chain.

Traditional plastics are produced from cellulose derived from highly toxic petroleum, but Hemp is the biggest producer of cellulose on the planet. Hemp is also non-toxic and biodegradable, making it a brilliant substitute for petroleum based plastics. Single use Hemp based plastics can biodegrade in as little as 58 days, compared to the 1000 years it takes a single plastic bottle to biodegrade.

While more and more companies are investing in developing Hemp and other plant-based plastics, the technology isn’t yet ready or affordable for everyday use. But as corporations such as Coca Cola invest more and more money in developing the technology for plant-based plastics to replace petroleum-based plastics, there is hope that soon there will be a viable replacement for single use plastics.


Homes Under the Hemp

Much like paper, Hemp is a brilliant wood substitute in the building industry too. Fiberboards made from Hemp-based composites are stronger and lighter than their timber-based counterparts. Hemp can also be mixed with lime to create hempcrete, which has insulation and soundproofing properties far superior to that of concrete, as well as absorbing CO₂ from the surrounding air.

Hemp is an incredibly hard wearing material, a Hemp-based house in Japan is more than 300 years old, making Hemp a sustainable alternative to traditional building materials.

While the final products make great homes for humans, fields of Hemp provides a home for a plethora of wildlife. Hemp flowers produce large quantities of pollen, making it ideal for bees and other insects, while the three-foot tall storks mean fields are great homes for all sorts of small birds and animals.


Pests Beware

There have long been arguments about the use of pesticides in agriculture, some say we shouldn’t use them because they pollute the land and waterways, and then poison wildlife too.  Pesticides have been linked to cancer, birth defects, and alzheimer’s disease, not only are they harmful to the natural world, they are dangerous to us as well.

Others say we need them or food shortages would become commonplace in the western world, as we’ve become so reliant on genetically modified farming to feed and clothe ourselves.

Unlike most agricultural produce, Hemp is naturally resistant to pests, therefore negating the need for the use of highly toxic pesticides and herbicides. Not only is this great news because Hemp is a nutritious food source, and being naturally pest resilient would mean less potential for pesticides to pollute our food, but Hemp can also be used in the textile industry. Popular natural textiles such as cotton and flax require large quantities of pesticides to help them grow, substituting these with Hemp would mean a huge reduction in the amount of pesticides used in industrial farming. This also means that Hemp, by its very nature, meets standards for organic farming.


Look Good in a Potato Sack

Hemp textile products have got a bit of a bad rep in the past, often likened to the rough, scratchy hessian fabric made for potato sacks and ‘bags for life’. But Hemp can be used to make a whole range of different products, including comfortable clothing, and unlike most other natural fibres, these durable Hemp fabrics get softer every time they are worn or washed.

Environmentalists are constantly warning us against wasting water, and as with pesticides, most natural textiles like cotton and flax require huge amounts of water to grow. Producing one kilo of cotton requires at least 5,000 litres of water, the same amount of Hemp can be produced with as little as 650 litres.

However, conserving water is not the only reason Hemp is a better textile option than cotton.

Most common fabrics that are used today go through some sort of highly toxic chemical process whether that is to extract the fibres from the plant, or to produce synthetic fibres. Hemp fibres, on the other hand, are easily extracted from the plant, negating the need for chemical processing. These fibres are also naturally fire resistant, meaning there is even fewer chemical processes for Hemp to go through compared to cotton or flax.

These chemical processes not only release pollutants into the air during the manufacturing process, they also leave a chemical residue in the fabrics which are also released back into the environment after clothes are disposed of and destroyed.

As well as being free from chemical residue, Hemp textiles filter out UV rays, helping to protect the skin from the dangers of sun exposure.


Nature’s Air Purifier

Hemp, along with a number of other plants, has been found to be useful in the Phytoremediation process.

Phytoremediation is the process of removing toxins from soil, air and water through the use of plants. This process has been used across the world to help clean up areas affected by high levels of pollution and following nuclear disasters.

In Ukraine in 1990, four years after the worst nuclear disaster the world had ever seen when explosions and fire ripped through Chernobyl’s reactor number four, scientists began introducing plants known for their phytoremediation properties to the exclusion zone surrounding the power plant and nearby town of Pripyat. At the beginning of the project field mustard and maize were planted throughout the 30km exclusion zone, already known for their ability to absorb nickel, lead and chromium. In 1996 sunflowers were planted, and then in 1998 Hemp was introduced to the area. Scientists working on the project described Hemp as one of the best phytoremediation plants they had been able to find. Hemp, along other suitable plants were later planted throughout affected areas in northern Ukraine, and in neighbouring Belarus, Hemp was planted in affected rural areas.

Phytoremediation was also implemented by local residents following the Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011 who planted millions of field mustard and sunflower seeds. Hemp, however, was not used due to Japan’s restrictive Cannabis Control Law, signed into law during American occupation in 1948.

While Hemp used in phytoremediation cannot be harvested for food, medicine or textiles, it can be safely transformed into building materials for eco-friendly housing.


(Not so) Sour Diesel

Due to its ability to grow in most environments with very little water compared to other crops, Hemp is an ideal plant for biofuel. Per acre Hemp produces more biodiesel than any other agricultural fuelstocks. The most common crops used for biofuel are soybeans, palm oil, sugar cane, and rapeseed, all of which require very specific growing conditions. As well as needing fertile soil and large quantities of water, these common crops also require the use of pesticides, herbicides and fertilisers, none of which are needed in the cultivation of Hemp.

Along with the ease of growing Hemp compared to other crops for biofuel, biodiesel produced from Hemp is the only biofuel that can run a conventional unmodified diesel engine without affecting the performance of the car, making it more accessible than other crops which can require costly engine modifications.

When used in a traditional diesel engine, the engine fumes emitted replace the usual smell of exhaust fumes with the smell of popcorn or french fries. As well as producing less emissions and pollution that petroleum based diesel, Hemp biodiesel also has a flash point of 145°C compared to the 52°C flashpoint of its petroleum-based cousin, making it safer all around.


Feed the World

Hemp has been farmed and cultivated by humans for thousands of years, it is even thought to be the first domesticated plant, having been found in Neolithic sites over 12,000 years old.

While research is still ongoing to determine the health benefits of cannabis-based medications, one thing we do know is that it is one of the most nutritionally dense food sources out there, packed with protein, – twice as much as quinoa – vitamins and iron, and low in fatty acids. It is a relatively inexpensive crop, and as such a resilient plant Hemp can thrive in most climates and terrains, from lush farmland to rocky hillsides and barren mountains.

Not only are Hemp seeds a great food source as they are, this versatile plant can also be made into staples such as oil, flour and milk, suitable for not just human consumption but animal consumption too.

As Hemp also purifies the soil and air in which it is grown, and has a seed to harvest cycle of approximately four months, it also supports sustainable farming. Not only does Hemp offer a year round crop, when introduced to a crop cycle it also improves the soil quality for the other crops.

Switching to Hemp based products won’t solve all of the world’s problems, and probably won’t lead to world peace, but it’s a good starting point for a cleaner, healthier, and happier world.

As leaders in the UK CBD industry, #Organics work in collaboration with expert farmers, chemists, technicians, and professors to bring high-quality products to the market. This means that all our products are 100% organic, non-GMO, ethically sourced, and suitable for vegetarians and vegans. In addition, all products and processes are fully compliant with UK regulatory bodies.

All #Organics products are 100% THC free, meaning they are safe, legal to use in the UK and won’t get you high. In January 2018, the World Anti Doping Agency removed CBD from their list of banned substances. So, no matter what you do, whether you’re an athlete or an accountant, #Organics products won’t show up on a drugs test or negatively affect your job.

Grown in nature, defined by science. #Organics

 

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World No Tobacco Day

Today is World No Tobacco Day and this year’s theme is Tobacco and Lung Health.

The dangers of smoking tobacco have been recognised as far back as the 1950s, with many high profile campaigns over the years aimed at educating smokers and helping them to quit.

What is less widely recognised, however, are the dangers associated with smoking cannabis. The likelihood of developing lung cancer and other respiratory diseases from smoking tobacco are regularly talked about, graphic images and warnings are placed on tobacco packaging and on our television screens. We’re constantly being told that smoking strong strains of cannabis such as Skunk can lead to psychological problems. Yet, it seems nobody is talking about the dangers of cannabis smoke.

Although many see smoking cannabis as a harmless, natural way of consuming the plant, numerous studies have concluded that smoking cannabis is actually worse for lung health than cigarettes.  

Whether it’s from a cigarette, a joint, or a bonfire, smoke inhalation is bad for us – there is no denying it – smoke created during combustion releases toxins and carcinogens. But it was only in 2007 that researchers in New Zealand began to make headway in understanding the link between cannabis smoke and respiratory problems similar to those seen in tobacco smokers.

Researchers concluded that smoking a single joint can cause as much damage to the lungs as chain-smoking five cigarettes. This is due to the different way in which cannabis is usually smoked, with deeper inhalation and users tending to hold their breath for longer than tobacco smokers. Joints also typically don’t have filters like cigarettes do, which leads to cannabis smokers inhaling ash along with smoke which causes even more damage to the throat and lining of the lungs.

Fortunately the CBD industry exists, offering oils, tablets, body balms and more as a safe, clean alternative to smoking cannabis.

As leaders in the UK CBD industry, #Organics work in collaboration with expert farmers, chemists, technicians, and professors to bring high-quality products to the market. This means that all our products are 100% organic, non-GMO, ethically sourced, and suitable for vegetarians and vegans. In addition, all products and processes are fully compliant with UK regulatory bodies.

All #Organics products are 100% THC free, meaning they are safe, legal to use in the UK and won’t get you high. In January 2018, the World Anti Doping Agency removed CBD from their list of banned substances. So, no matter what you do, whether you’re an athlete or an accountant, #Organics products won’t show up on a drugs test or negatively affect your job.

Grown in nature, defined by science. #Organics

 

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National Epilepsy Week

In 2018, the UK government rescheduled cannabis from schedule 1 – which categorises the drug as dangerous, with high potential for addiction and abuse, and no medical value – to schedule 2. Drugs categorised as schedule 2 are still recognised as having a high potential for abuse but as also having medical value, such as morphine, codeine and oxycontin.

The rescheduling of cannabis means researchers are now able to carry out clinical trials, without requiring a Home Office licence, to investigate the drug’s usefulness in treating a wide range of conditions, including epilepsy. Whilst these trials are ongoing and legal cannabis oil remains difficult to access for patients, neurologist are beginning to recommend CBD oil as an alternative treatment for some forms of epilepsy.

Epilepsy is a neurological condition which causes bursts of electrical activity in the brain known as seizures, which temporarily affect how the brain functions. This complex condition has been at the centre of an uphill battle in the UK to legalise cannabis for medicinal use.

The law in the UK was changed to allow specialist doctors to prescribe cannabis oil containing both CBD and THC, following the high profile cases of Billy Caldwell and Alfie Dingley. Both Billy and Alfie suffer from rare forms of childhood epilepsy which can cause hundreds of seizures a day.

However, this option is only available in extreme cases where conventional treatment has failed. Patients are then forced to have their prescription reviewed by a local hospital board and then approved by their local authority, despite it being prescribed by a specialist doctor. Both the hospital board and local authority can block the prescription, citing reasons such as a lack of clinical trials or a belief that it is an unsafe medicine, preventing the patient from obtaining the medicine.

If a patient does manage to get their prescription approved, they still then have to pay for the cannabis oil to be imported under licence from The Netherlands. Patients can also try going private, as prescriptions from private doctors do not go through the same scrutiny as NHS ones do. However, patients with a private prescription still have to pay for the medicine to be imported under licence from The Netherlands, which all adds up to £20,000 per year – far out of the average patient’s price range.

As more and more clinical trials are carried out to examine how cannabis can affect epilepsy, and NHS patients are blocked by local authorities from receiving medicinal cannabis, some are turning to the legal world of CBD to help treat the condition.

Current NHS guidelines claim that cannabis oils do not offer much help to those suffering from more common or milder forms of epilepsy, but that it could offer hope to youngsters suffering from severe forms of childhood epilepsy, such as Dravet Syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome. These rare forms of epilepsy can cause hundreds of seizures every day, and are associated with learning difficulties and developmental delay, often leading to psychosis, institutionalisation, and an early death.

Cannabis oil used to treat epilepsy combines both CBD and THC which work on the Endocannabinoid System, altering brain chemistry to reduce seizures. But fears are now being raised that the psychoactive cannabinoid THC could impact brain development in young people.

Many doctors are still hesitant to prescribe cannabis oil containing THC despite it being legalised, or recommend patients try CBD – even when all other treatments have failed –  choosing instead to rely on conventional medicines.

However, the British Paediatric Neurology Association (BPNA) has welcomed the rescheduling of cannabis-based medical products as it will allow for more research and clinical trials into their use in treating epilepsy and other neurological conditions. While more research is being carried out into the effects of THC on brain development, the BPNA is recommending CBD oil as a treatment for patients with rare forms of epilepsy such as Dravet and Lennox-Gastaut Syndromes which are difficult to treat with conventional pharmaceuticals.

As leaders in the UK CBD industry, #Organics work in collaboration with expert farmers, chemists, technicians, and professors to bring high-quality products to the market. This means that all our products are 100% organic, non-GMO, ethically sourced, and suitable for vegetarians and vegans. In addition, all products and processes are fully compliant with UK regulatory bodies.

All #Organics products are 100% THC free, meaning they are safe, legal to use in the UK and won’t get you high. In January 2018, the World Anti Doping Agency removed CBD from their list of banned substances. So, no matter what you do, whether you’re an athlete or an accountant, #Organics products won’t show up on a drugs test or negatively affect your job.

Grown in nature, defined by science. #Organics

 

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CBD and Mental Health

Recent studies show that more and more people are turning away from conventional treatment for mental health problems, and instead choosing CBD (Cannabidiol) to help improve their mental health.

Although mental health has become less of a taboo in recent years with more and more people seeking help, research conducted by Eos Scientific found that 15 million Brits are still apprehensive about visiting their doctor and seeking help.

However, that apprehension has changed from worries surrounding the taboo of mental illness, to worries about the kind of treatment that will be prescribed.

Concerns included the strength of medication, either it being too strong or too weak, as well as negative side effects associated with conventional antidepressants and anti-anxiety medication. Of those who were wary of taking prescription medicines for mental health problems, 47% were aged 18-34.

Those in this age group were also the most likely to choose CBD over prescription medication as a treatment for mental health problems than any other age group. The study also showed that 38% of adults would prefer to treat mental health problems with CBD – of those, 50% were aged 18-34.

The same study also found that those working in high-stress careers were also turning to CBD products to cope with the pressure of their work.

The average working week in the UK is 40 hours, with the law stating 48 hours as the maximum. Yet 21% claim to regularly exceed that limit, with that figure rising to 35% in London. Over 9 million people in the UK believe that their work-life balance is negatively affecting their mental health.

Once again, 18-34 year olds, the so-called ‘millennial’ generation, were the most likely to turn to CBD, with almost 40% reporting either using it or willing to try it to help deal with the stresses of their job and poor work-life balance.  

CBD works by attaching itself to the Endocannabinoid System, which is responsible for maintaining balance and equilibrium within the human body by regulating mental health, pain sensitivity, inflammation, sleep and immunity, amongst many other things.

The research, published last month, found that CBD use had more than doubled in the UK over the past year, with consumers finding it a more manageable way to treat their mental health than conventional pharmaceuticals.

As leaders in the UK CBD industry, #Organics work in collaboration with expert farmers, chemists, technicians, and professors to bring high-quality products to the market. This means that all our products are 100% organic, non-GMO, ethically sourced, and suitable for vegetarians and vegans. In addition, all products and processes are fully compliant with UK regulatory bodies.

All #Organics products are 100% THC free, meaning they are safe, legal to use in the UK and won’t get you high. In January 2018, the World Anti Doping Agency removed CBD from their list of banned substances. So, no matter what you do, whether you’re an athlete or an accountant, #Organics products won’t show up on a drugs test or negatively affect your job.

Grown in nature, defined by science. #Organics

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420 Day – The History of Medical Marijuana

Cannabis. Hemp. Marijuana. Hashish. Pot. Kush. Weed. Reefer. Ganja. Mary Jane.

Medicinal. Recreational.

Legal. Illegal.

Legal again?

Our relationship with the Cannabis Sativa plant is long, complicated, and seemingly ever-changing, so this 420 Day we take a brief look at the history of medical marijuana.

With cannabis illegal in most countries from the beginning of the 20th century, 420 Day became the ‘unofficially-official’ counterculture holiday celebrating cannabis. What began as a group of high school friends in California searching for a rumoured abandoned cannabis crop, became an excuse to illegally light up in public with a group of like-minded people and stick it to the man.

However, as more and more countries make moves to legalise Cannabis in some form, and with the increased popularity of CBD products, 420 Day has become less about counterculture and more about dancing mascots and counting profits.

But it hasn’t always been this way.

Indigenous to Central Asia and India, the cannabis plant has been found by archaeologists across the continent dating back to 8,000 BC, utilised as food, fabric, and medicine.

Throughout the ancient world, from China to India, Egypt to Greece, cannabis was celebrated for its medical and recreational properties.

Chinese emperors called it Ma and praised it for its healing properties, administering it for over 100 maladies including rheumatism and malaria, claiming it possessed both yin and yang to help the body keep in balance. In Ancient India it was used to treat leprosy and fevers, as well as being mixed with milk into Bhang to be used as an anesthetic. Persian philosophers claimed it to be the most important of over 10,000 medicinal plants. The Egyptians prescribed it for glaucoma and inflammation, and cannabis pollen was even found on the mummified body of Egyptian pharaoh Ramesses II. In Ancient Greece, cannabis was used to remedy earache and edema.

Cannabis is even mentioned in the Bible, with the Book of Exodus describing the original recipe for holy anointing oil passed from God to Moses as including Kaneh-Bosem – hemp oil.

Medicinal cannabis was used far and wide for millennia, from the Ancient Chinese to the Victorians, Shakespeare was reported to be a fan, and Queen Victoria once said “it is one of the most valuable medicines we possess.” The first president of the USA, George Washington, grew industrial hemp on his plantation, and at one point it was even illegal to not grow cannabis in parts of the USA! In Jamestown, Virginia, 1762, the state rewarded growers and penalties were imposed on those who did not produce it.

However, around the turn of the twentieth-century cannabis quickly went from one of the most valuable medicines we could have, to public enemy number one. The combination of misinformation, fear, and racism all culminated in the prohibition of cannabis and the ensuing ‘War on Drugs’.

While there are many conspiracy theories to explain why cannabis was banned – such as the claim that hemp was ruining the timber industry as it was more efficient to produce items such as paper from hemp than timber, which lead to the timber industry lobbying for cannabis prohibition – the main factor that led to the demonisation, and eventual criminalisation, of cannabis in both the UK and the USA was racism.

Although hemp had been used in everyday life for millennia, it was not until the beginning of the twentieth century that smoking cannabis became more common practice in western society. While cannabis in the form of oils and tablets derived from hemp did not cause the euphoric highs we now associate with cannabis, this new form of cannabis, smoked recreationally, did and authorities didn’t like it. In the USA this new form of recreational cannabis was referred to by its Spanish name ‘marijuana’, and its popularity attributed to Mexican migration to the USA following the Mexican revolution. In the UK it became associated with immigrants from elsewhere in the Commonwealth, such as India and the Caribbean.

It was not the first time authorities has used drugs to target minority groups and further embed racist attitudes in society – opium was previously banned to target the Chinese communities, not to protect the general public from drug misuse and abuse. Nor was it the last, with people of colour today statistically more likely to be arrested for drug possession, and face stiffer sentences than the white population.

By associating cannabis with migrants from India and the Caribbean in the UK, and with Mexicans and African Americans in the USA, lawmakers could further demonise minority groups and spread fear and misinformation about cannabis. Throughout the 1920s and 1930s both countries passed a series of laws criminalising the cultivation, sale, possession, and consumption of cannabis. Propaganda such as the film Reefer Madness (1936) served to further the idea that cannabis, and therefore the minority groups associated with it, were dangers to society.

And so it stayed with prohibition laws in various forms, until the 1990s, when scientists discovered the Endocannabinoid System and began to understand different chemical compounds found in cannabis interact with the human body. The Endocannabinoid System is one of the human body’s major organ systems, responsible for maintaining homeostasis – essentially it is our body’s internal balancing mechanism. Rather than a structural organ system like the Cardiovascular or Respiratory Systems, the Endocannabinoid System has receptors on the body’s other main organs for cannabinoids to attach themselves to. With receptors throughout the body it helps to regulate functions such as inflammation, mental health, and pain sensitivity.

While different states in the USA began legalising medical marijuana and eventually cannabis for recreational use, with California leading the charge in 1996, in the UK, cannabis remains a Class B drug. Moves to legalise cannabis for medical reasons are gaining traction in the UK, motivated by the case of 12-year-old Billy Caldwell, who suffers severe epilepsy had cannabis oil confiscated at Heathrow airport after returning from Canada. Caldwell’s mother had purchased a six month supply to treat her son who suffers up to 100 seizures everyday. Caldwell had previously been treated in Canada and the USA where medicinal cannabis is legal, but was unable to get it in the UK.

Medicinal cannabis was legalised in Scotland, England, and Wales in November 2018, meaning specialised doctors will now be able to prescribe the drug. Restrictions are in place to ensure the quality of medicinal cannabis, and laws pertaining to the Class B drug are still enforced. At the same time, CBD has been growing in popularity across the globe.

Unlike medicinal cannabis and marijuana, CBD does not contain the chemical THC which is responsible for the euphoric high associated with cannabis. CBD shops have sprung up everywhere all over the world, selling all manner of CBD infused products, from oils and capsules to gummy bears and energy drinks.

However, in 2016 the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) ruled that if CBD is being advertised for medical purposes it needs to be licensed. This means that while CBD is technically legal in the UK, manufacturers cannot make any kind of medical claims about it. There are an increasing number of scientific studies being conducted into the effects and benefits of CBD, but these are not yet enough to classify it as a medicine, and therefore it remains classified as a food supplement.

As leaders in the UK CBD industry, #Organics work in collaboration with expert farmers, chemists, technicians, and professors to bring high-quality products to the market. This means that all our products are 100% organic, non-GMO, ethically sourced, and suitable for vegetarians and vegans. In addition, all products and processes are fully compliant with UK regulatory bodies.

All #Organics products are 100% THC free, meaning they are safe, legal to use in the UK and won’t get you high. In January 2018, the World Anti Doping Agency removed CBD from their list of banned substances. So, no matter what you do, whether you’re an athlete or an accountant, #Organics products won’t show up on a drugs test or negatively affect your job.

Grown in nature, defined by science. #Organics

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Stress Awareness Month

Stress is defined as a physical, mental, or emotional factor that causes bodily or mental tension. Stresses can be external (environment, psychological, or social situations) or internal (illness).

A certain amount of stress is good for us, we need stress to survive. Stress heightens our senses, triggers things like the ‘fight or flight’ response, and can be a big motivational factor for meeting goals. Some studies even suggest that moderate levels of stress can help improve the immune system and improve recovery times following surgery.

However, too much stress can be detrimental to both our mental and physical health.

The Stress Management Society describes stress as one of the great public health challenges of our time. Too much stress can lead to other mental health problems such as anxiety and depression, as well as sleep disturbances, increased blood pressure, and a weakened immune system, amongst others.

As with many of our body’s daily functions, the Endocannabinoid system plays a role in managing our stress levels, helping us to balance the ‘good’ stress we need to survive with the ‘bad’ stress that can lead to ill-health. This is due to the fact that a large concentration of the endocannabinoid system’s receptors are found in the area of the brain which is responsible for regulating our mood.

When cannabinoids such as CBD interact with receptors in this part of the Endocannabinoid system, they moderate the way we process stressful situations by reducing the number of erratic stress signals our brains produce. By helping us to better process the stressful situation, symptoms of stress are reduced and can aid us in dealing with a similar stressful situation in the future. CBD impacts both the CB1 and CB2 receptors in the Endocannabinoid system, but binds itself only to CB2 receptors. Instead of also binding itself to CB1 receptors, CBD inhibits enzymes that break down the body’s natural cannabinoids such as Anandamide, meaning that the CB1 receptors are able to absorb more of the body’s own natural cannabinoids.

As CBD, and other products derived from Hemp, don’t contain the psychoactive THC chemical responsible for the high feeling associated with smoking marijuana, these products don’t provide the same euphoric feeling as smoking cannabis would. However, CBD products such as CBD Hemp Oil Tincture are absorbed into the bloodstream and help boost the body’s own natural processes.

As leaders in the UK CBD industry, #Organics work in collaboration with expert farmers, chemists, technicians, and professors to bring high-quality products to the market. This means that all our products are 100% organic, non-GMO, ethically sourced, and suitable for vegetarians and vegans. In addition, all products and processes are fully compliant with UK regulatory bodies.

All #Organics products are 100% THC free, meaning they are safe, legal to use in the UK and won’t get you high. In January 2018, the World Anti Doping Agency removed CBD from their list of banned substances. So, no matter what you do, whether you’re an athlete or an accountant, #Organics products won’t show up on a drugs test or negatively affect your job.

Grown in nature, defined by science. #Organics

 

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Third Party Testing

Hashtag Organics CBD is rigorously tested throughout the entire supply chain but that isnt enough to satisfy our quality standard. We also require a third-party, independent analysis to prove that out products contain what is listed on the label, are free of adulteration and meet the most stringent quality requirements.

Third Party Testing

Hashtag Organics CBD is rigorously tested throughout the entire supply chain but that isnt enough to satisfy our quality standard. We also require a third-party, independent analysis to prove that out products contain what is listed on the label, are free of adulteration and meet the most stringent quality requirements.

Our Promise

We strive to always offer accurate and objective information about CBD. We encourage the positive growth of the hemp industry while providing up-to-date information concering this plant. Our goal is to fight the spread of misinformation concerning CBD. We are committed to never exaggerating any scientific data on this subject, and we encourage others in the industry and online to follow our example.

Our Promise

We strive to always offer accurate and objective information about CBD. We encourage the positive growth of the hemp industry while providing up-to-date information concering this plant. Our goal is to fight the spread of misinformation concerning CBD. We are committed to never exaggerating any scientific data on this subject, and we encourage others in the industry and online to follow our example.

Hashtag Organics Ltd | Kyle House | Glasgow G22 7XS | Email: info@hashtagorganics.co.uk | Tel: 0141 255 1868

Hashtag Organics Ltd | Kyle House | Glasgow G22 7XS
Email: info@hashtagorganics.co.uk | Tel: 0141 255 1868

Food and Drug Administration Disclosure. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat or cure any disease. Always check with your doctor or physician before starting a new dietary supplement programme. All Hashtag Organics products contain 0% THC.

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